Several months ago I responded to a call for submissions on “Books that changed my life” at an entertaining and eclectic site called The Drunken Odyssey – a podcast about the writing life. Virginia Woolf’s A Writer’s Diary changed my life dramatically more than 25 years ago. This was a great opportunity to tell my tale outside of the usual Woolfian circles—to preach beyond the choir.

My husband is a musician with a home studio, so he recorded the piece, edited out my faltering and fumbling, and added guitar and sound accompaniment. The segment was published this month in Episode 189 of The Drunken Odyssey (linked here). It starts with a lengthy discussion about Lawrence Ferlinghetti. If you want to skip ahead, I’m at the end, starting at about 51:50.

 

 

 

My previous post omitted the link to the essay – I’m starting over….

Creature of habit that I am, the first morning of every visit to San Francisco starts with a walk to North Beach, breakfast at La Boulange, hanging out for a while in Washington Square to watch the Chinese women going through their exercise routines, then up the steep-stepped hill to Coit Tower.

My fascination over the last few years has led me to delve into the history of the tower, its murals, and the woman for whom it’s named, Lillie Coit. My essay, “Lillie’s Legacy,” is published in the Winter issue of 1966, a journal of research-based creative nonfiction that I’ve long admired.

And how does Virginia Woolf fit into my story about Lillie Coit? Read it here.

Creature of habit that I am, the first morning of every visit to San Francisco starts with a walk to North Beach, breakfast at La Boulange, hanging out for a while in Washington Square to watch the Chinese women going through their exercise routines, then up the steep-stepped hill to Coit Tower.

My fascination over the last few years has led me to delve into the history of the tower, its murals, and the woman for whom it’s named, Lillie Coit. My essay, “Lillie’s Legacy,” is published in the Winter issue of 1966, a journal of research-based creative nonfiction that I’ve long admired.

And how does Virginia Woolf fit into my story about Lillie Coit? Read it here.

 

Some day I may play the piano again; for now I’ll just write about it.

My essay “Prelude in C” was published in the latest issue of Foliate Oak Literary Magazine.

Read it here!

My latest published essay, “Alef, Bet, Gimel: Contemplations of a Wandering Jew” begins: “Being Jewish is my legacy, but what does that mean?” In this exploratory work I dig around in my roots to puzzle out what for me is an elusive identity yet one that I cling to.

I’m happy to have this work published in the 33rd issue of Hamilton Stone Review. Read it here in the nonfiction section.

That line from Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park is the first of a number of quotations that I use to augment my essay, “My Quarrel with Grieving,” which was published in the Winter 2015 issue of Permafrost. Here’s the link.

This is my take on a difficult topic. Ruminating, researching and writing this piece turned out to be it’s own reward in that I solidified some of my thinking during the process. Still, it was gratifying to see it published in the 37th volume of the farthest north literary journal in the U.S.

Lest you think I’m slighting my number one source of quotes and inspiration, Virginia Woolf–no stranger to grief–is an integral part.

It’s a monograph: “a specialist work of writing on a single subject or an aspect of a subject, usually by a single author.” But indulge me–it has an ISBN, an International Standard Book Number, so let’s call it a book–a small book, but a book (we won’t trivialize it with “booklet” or “bookette”). Thank you!

That said, I’m happy to announce that Virginia Woolf as Memoirist: ‘I am made and remade continually’ has just been released by Cecil Woolf Publishers in London. This is my second inclusion in the Bloomsbury Heritage Series, which includes more than 70 publications about the lives and work of Virginia Woolf and others in the Bloomsbury group.

Cecil Woolf is the nephew of Leonard Woolf and the last living link to Virginia Woolf; he proudly points to Virginia’s mentions of him in her diary as “the boy with the sloping nose.” Cecil’s wife, Jean Moorcroft Wilson, is the general editor of the series as well as a Woolfian author and biographer of World War I poets. Cecil and Jean crossed the pond earlier this month to honor us with their presence at the 25th Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania.

Woolf2015-Cecil&Jean&monograph

Here I am with the esteemed duo, displaying my newest addition.

More information about Cecil Woolf Publishers and the Bloomsbury Heritage Series is available at Blogging Woolf.

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